Guest Editor’s Picks: The Peahen

Editor's Picks, Fashion v October 6, 2015
 
 
Kasi Martin is dedicated to making ethical standards in fashion mainstream. As the creator of The Peahen, Kasi writes about brands, designers, issues and trends at the intersection of style and standards. The Peahen takes its inspiration from the name for a female peacock to represent the bold pursuit of fashion. Kasi’s vision is to anchor this pursuit in deeper meaning that will help to transform fashion as we know it. If it minimizes fashion’s negative impact, and maximizes style, it’s on her radar.
 
The Peahan’s TOP PICKS  
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Layered Cuffs – Ways of Change

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Infinity Scarf – Scrappy Products

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Kyoto Reversible Dress – Wabi Sabi Eco Fashion

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
[Find all of Kasi’s picks on pinterest!] 
 
EH: Describe your style in one sentence.
 
KM: My style is “polish with a bit of interest”. I try to do this by adopting an uptown uniform of basics and blending them with eclectic accessories. 
 
EH: What’s currently at the top of your lust list and why?
 
KM: This versatile black trenchWhy? Because standout, travel-ready pieces are a priority in my life at the moment. The draping on this trench gives it more interest than a run-of-the-mill travel jacket. It holds up with equal caliber if it’s tossed on over a v-neck and sneakers for a flight or a silk dress for a night out. All it needs is a vintage scarf and a unique accessory for a touch of personality.
 
black trench ethical 2
 
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EH: How do you lead a conscious lifestyle?

KM: My number one rule is to shop for clothes like I shop for groceries. If I don’t know where it comes from or if it’s made with ethical ingredients, I don’t buy it. I’m a big proponent of the fashion industry having regulated labels like our groceries. If our chicken is labeled local and non-GMO, why can’t our cotton T-shirts? 
I love when I get asked this question because there’s so much more to conscious living than cutting down on water and saving energy. It’s about making informed decisions that go against the grain of consumerism. It takes strong willpower to fight the immediate gratification that cheap, fast-fashion offers. It’s a struggle, even for someone who preaches ethical fashion! I hold myself accountable to my own standard by asking a few questions before I buy any new item for my closet: “Will I wear this more than 10 times?” “How much effort went into manufacturing this product?” “Does the brand openly tell me how it produces its clothing.” Ecohabitude products get a ‘yes’ to all of the above.
 
For more inspiration, follow Kasi on instagram!
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